March 2018
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Peas and Lentils

A poor farmer went to the market to sell some peas and lentils. However, as he had only one sack and didn’t want to mix peas and lentils, he poured in the peas first, tied the sack in the middle, and then filled the top portion of the sack with the lentils. At the market a rich innkeeper happened by with his own sack. He wanted to buy the peas, but he did not want the lentils.
Pouring the seed anywhere else but the sacks is considered soiling. Trading sacks is not allowed. The farmer can’t cut a hole in his sack. How would you transfer the peas to the innkeeper’s sack, which he wants to keep, without soiling the produce?

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6 guesses to Peas and Lentils

  • Ruthie Jean

    Put the Peas. in then tie it tight,then turn it inside out and then put the lentils in the other side

  • You’re correct Ruthie Jean!

    Pour the lentils into the innkeeper’s sack, bind it with a twist and turn inside out. Pour in the peas. Then unbind the sack a pour the lentils back to your sack.

    You’re today’s winner!

  • John

    Why can’t the innkeeper tie his sack vertically in the middle and make 2 vertical compartments? Is that a valid answer?

  • Catherine Y

    Pour the lentils into the innkeeper’s sack and trade sacks so the innkeeper has the farmer’s original sack with the peas and the farmer has the innkeeper’s sack with the lentils

  • Steph

    Pour the lentils into the Innkeeper’s sack and close that portion of his sack by twisting it several times (to keep peas snuggly in that portion of the bag), then turn the Innkeepers sack inside out and pour the peas in. Then the Innkeeper would hold the “bottom” of his sack over the Farmer’s sack (so as not to allow the peas to become soiled by falling on the ground) untwist the part of the sack that holds the peas securely in place and drop the peas into the Farmer’s sack. Or, instead of twisting the sack after the peas are poured in, the Innkeeper could also tie off the sack with string borrowed from the Farmer (since we know he “tied off his sack in the middle”…”tied off” implies the use of string, etc) then turn bag inside out and pour lentils in. Then the Innkeeper could reach into the lentils and below the section of sack that hides the peas and untie the string, allowing the peas to fall into the Farmer’s sack.

  • Nathan

    What’s wrong with putting an hole in the bag? Is it like, a hole anarchy? Any holes will not be permitted?